The Life of the Posters

In thinking about where they were printed, I also was thinking about where the posters were advertised. I had a clue that they looked similar in size, shape, and amount of information as the advertisments on the front of streetcars around Vancouver at that time.

An example of where the posters might have been advertised. There aren't many photos of streetcars in the 20's to be found online - in this image, you can see the rectangular frames on the front of the car where posters could be placed; in this photo, only one is being used. courtesy City of Vancouver Archives. 

The dates on the posters are all in the same narrow time window; I imagine the cabin builder might have gotten all the posters in one or two batches from the nearest streetcar station. 

Not all were printed in Vancouver, but the posters for the Empress Theatre were all printed at A.H. Timms print shop (on the posters, indicated as Timms Show Print Service). In the 1920's, the print shop was located at 228 East 14th Avenue, see photo below:

 Courtesy City of Vancouver Archives

Courtesy City of Vancouver Archives

 Photo from inside the shop showing the machinery of printing. By Philip T. Timms, courtesy City of Vancouver Archives

Photo from inside the shop showing the machinery of printing. By Philip T. Timms, courtesy City of Vancouver Archives

I was so surprised to see the kind of street in this picture: the dirt road and the humble building look like they are out in the countryside. 

While browsing the archives, looking for photos of Vancouver in the 1920's, one photographer's name is attached to most of the photos: Philip T. Timms. While A. H. Timms went into the printing industry, Philip was out on the street taking countless photos. Notably this mesmerizing photo of A.H. Timms and his family outside of their home at 240 East 14th Avenue:

 A. H. Timms and family. Photo by Philip T. Timms. Courtesy City of Vancouver Archives

A. H. Timms and family. Photo by Philip T. Timms. Courtesy City of Vancouver Archives

Most of Philip Timms' photos from this time period are crisp and somewhat haunting. In this one there is a mark on the negative that caused a ghostly wisp to appear in the darkened doorway behind the hood of the car. The state of the street again surprised me in this photo - it looks like the car is driving on a rutted lawn. Unfortunately the house no longer stands at the address on 14th avenue; there is nothing but low rise apartment buildings on the street now.